Acquittal

A jury verdict that a criminal defendant is not guilty, or the finding of a judge that the evidence is insufficient to support a conviction.

Additional Sources

Answers.com

Judgment, as by a jury or judge, that a defendant is not guilty of a crime as charged.

The state of being found or proved not guilty.

Duhaime Legal Dictionary

A decision by a judge that a person accused of a crime is discharged of it, found not guilty.

Once acquitted, a person cannot be tried again for the same offence.

Encyclopedia Britannica

In criminal law, acknowledgment by the court of the innocence of the defendant or defendants. Such a judgment may be made by a jury in a trial or by a judge who rules that there is insufficient evidence either for conviction or for further proceedings.

FindLaw

A release or discharge from debt or other liability.

A setting free or deliverance from the charge of an offense by verdict of a jury, judgment of a court, or other legal process.

Law.com Dictionary

What an accused criminal defendant receives if he/she is found not guilty. It is a verdict (a judgment in a criminal case) of not guilty.

Lawyers.com

Release or discharge from debt or other liability.

A setting free or deliverance from the charge of an offense by verdict of a jury, judgment of a court, or other legal process.

Legal-Dictionary.org

Set free from a criminal charge.

Merriam Webster

Setting free from the charge of an offense by verdict, sentence, or other legal process.

The Free (Legal) Dictionary

ACQUITTAL, contracts. A release or discharge from an obligation or engagement. According to Lord Coke there are three kinds of acquittal, namely; 1. By deed, when the party releases the obligation; 2. By prescription; 3. By tenure.

The absolution of a party charged with a crime or misdemeanor. Technically speaking, acquittal is - the absolution of a party accused on a trial before a traverse jury. Acquittals are of two kinds, in fact and in law. The former takes place when the jury upon trial finds a verdict of not guilty; the latter when a man is charged merely as an accessary, and the principal has been acquitted. An acquittal is a bar to any future prosecution for the offence alleged in the first indictment.

Wikipedia

In the common law tradition, an acquittal formally certifies the innocence of the accused, as far as the criminal law is concerned. This is so even where the prosecution is abandoned nolle prosequi. Under the rules of double jeopardy and autrefois acquit, an acquittal operates to bar the retrial of the accused for the same offense, even if new evidence surfaces that further implicates the accused. The effect of an acquittal on criminal proceedings is the same whether it results from a jury verdict, or whether it results from the operation of some other rule that discharges the accused.

Scots law has two acquittal verdicts: not guilty and not proven. However a verdict of "not proven" does not give rise to the double jeopardy rule.