Bankruptcy Court

The bankruptcy judges in regular active service in each district; a unit of the district court.

Additional Sources

FindLaw

A court that is a unit of a federal District Court and has original jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases.

Law.com Dictionary

The specialized federal court in which bankruptcy matters under the Federal Bankruptcy Act are conducted. There are several bankruptcy courts in each state, and each one's territory covers several counties. The office of a court clerk, where petitions can be filed, is located next to each court.

Lawyers.com

A court that is a unit of a federal District Court and has original jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases Bankruptcy courts were created by Congress as part of the 1898 Bankruptcy Act. Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution gives Congress the power to establish uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States.

The Free (Legal) Dictionary

The specialized Federal court in which bankruptcy matters under the Federal Bankruptcy Act are conducted. There are several bankruptcy courts in each state, and each one's territory covers several counties. The office of a court clerk where petitions can be filed is located next to each court.

Wikipedia

United States bankruptcy courts are federal courts that have subject-matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy cases. Bankruptcy cases cannot be filed in state court.[clarification needed][citation needed] Each of the 94 federal judicial districts handles bankruptcy matters. The separate system of bankruptcy courts was created by United States Congress in 1979.