Cross Examination

Cross examination refers to the questioning of a witness by the party that is directly opposed to the one who actually produced the witness.

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Additional Sources

Answers.com

v., -ined, -in·ing, -ines.

v.tr.
  1. To question (a person) closely, especially with regard to answers or information given previously.
  2. Law. To question (a witness already examined by the opposing side).
v.intr.

To question a person closely.

Duhaime Legal Dictionary

The examination of a witness called by the other side at trial and for which leading questions are permitted.

FindLaw

the examination of a witness who has already testified in order to check or discredit the witness's testimony, knowledge, or credibility

Law.com Dictionary

n. the opportunity for the attorney (or an unrepresented party) to ask questions in court of a witness who has testified in a trial on behalf of the opposing party. The questions on cross-examination are limited to the subjects covered in the direct examination of the witness, but importantly, the attorney may ask leading questions, in which he/she is allowed to suggest answers or put words in the witness's mouth.

Lawyers.com

the examination of a witness who has already testified in order to check or discredit the witness's testimony, knowledge, or credibility see also confrontation clause

Lect Law Library

The questioning of an opposing party's witness about matters brought up during direct examination.

The examination of a witness, by the party who did not call him, upon matters to which he has been examined in chief.

Merriam Webster

the examination of a witness who has already testified in order to check or discredit the witness's testimony, knowledge, or credibility — compare direct examination

Wikipedia

In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by one's opponent.

The main purposes of cross-examination are to elicit favorable facts from the witness, or to impeach the credibility of the testifying witness to lessen the weight of unfavourable testimony. Cross-examination frequently produces critical evidence in trials, especially if a witness contradicts previous testimony. The advocate Edward Marshall-Hall built his career on cross-examination which often involved histrionic outbursts designed to sway jurors.