Objection

An Objection used as a legal term refers to statement by an attorney taking exception to court testimony or the attempted admission of evidence to the court and opposing its consideration as evidence to be used for that specific case.

Additional Sources

Answers.com

The formal registration of protest against the admission of a piece of evidence at trial, on the grounds of some legal defect.

FindLaw

1: an act or instance of objecting - a statement of opposition to an aspect of a judicial or other legal proceeding Example: file an objection to a proposed bankruptcy plan

2: a reason or argument forming the ground of an objection Note: Objections at trial are generally made for the purpose of opposing the admission of improper evidence. Such an objection must be made in a timely manner. Objections prevent the jury from seeing or hearing the evidence and preserve the issue for appeal. Objections may also be made on the ground of the opposing counsel's improper methods (as leading a witness) or for other technical reasons.

Law.com Dictionary

n. a lawyer's protest about the legal propriety of a question which has been asked of a witness by the opposing attorney, with the purpose of making the trial judge decide if the question can be asked. A proper objection must be based on one of the specific reasons for not allowing a question. These include: irrelevant, immaterial, incompetent (often stated together, which may mean the question is not about the issues in the trial or the witness is not qualified to answer), hearsay (the answer would be what someone told the witness rather than what he/she knew first-hand), leading (putting words in the mouth of one's own witness), calls for a conclusion (asking for opinion, not facts), compound question (two or more questions asked together), or lack of foundation (referring to a document lacking testimony as to authenticity or source). An objection must be made quickly and loudly to halt the witness before he/she answers. The judge will either "sustain" the objection (ruling out the question) or "overrule" it (allow the question). The judge may ask for an "offer of proof" in which the lawyer asking the question must explain to the court the reason the question is relevant, and what evidence his/her questions will bring out. Badly worded, confusing or compound questions are usually challenged by an objection to the form of the question, which is essentially a demand that the question be withdrawn and reworded. An attorney may "object" to a witness's answer as "non-responsive" to the question, but the proper request should be that the answer or a comment without a question be "stricken" from the record.

Legal-Dictionary.org

Stating for the record in a legal proceeding that the evidence presented is improper or unfairly harmful to a party in the proceeding. The judge rules on the objection and decides whether to admit the evidence. These decisions are reviewable on appeal.

The Free (Legal) Dictionary

A formal attestation or declaration of disapproval concerning a specific point of law or procedure during the course of a trial; a statement indicating disagreement with a judge's ruling.

Some laws provide that an appeal to a higher tribunal can be based only upon errors objected to during the course of a trial conducted in a lower court. An error that initially slips by without any objection by the party's counsel cannot subsequently be set forth as a reason for the appeals court to overturn the original decision in a particular case. The making of objections in open court during the course of a proceeding is important so that on appeal, the appellate court can evaluate the record of the lower court action.

The Federal Rules of Evidence, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure govern the making of objections in federal actions. Comparable state provisions apply to state proceedings.

Wikipedia

In the law of the United States of America, an objection is a formal protest raised in court during a trial to disallow a witness's testimony or other evidence which would be in violation of the rules of evidence or other procedural law. An objection is typically raised after the opposing party asks a question of the witness, but before the witness can answer, or when the opposing party is about to enter something into evidence. The judge then makes a ruling on whether the objection is "sustained" (the judge agrees with the objection and disallows the question, testimony, or evidence) or "overruled" (the judge disagrees with the objection and allows the question, testimony, or evidence). An attorney may choose to "rephrase" a question that has been objected to, so long as the judge permits it. Lawyers should make an objection before there was an answer to the question.