Real Property

Real Property refers to fixed property such as land or a building or something that has become permanently attached to land or to a building.

Additional Sources

Answers.com

Land, including the surface, whatever is attached to the surface such as buildings or trees, whatever is beneath the surface, such as minerals, and the area above the surface, i.e., the sky.

Duhaime Legal Dictionary

Immoveable property such as land or a building or an object that, though at one time a chattel, has become permanently affixed to land or a building.

Encyclopedia Britannica

a basic division of property in English common law, roughly corresponding to the division between immovables and movables in civil law. At common law most interests in land and fixtures (such as permanent buildings) were classified as real-property interests. Leasehold interests in land, however, together with interests in tangible movables (e.g., goods, animals, or merchandise) and interests in intangibles (e.g., stocks, bonds, or bank accounts) were classified as personal-property interests, if they were classified as property at all. Personal property, also known as “chattels,” could be further subdivided into chattels personal (interests in tangible movables and in intangibles) and chattels real (personal property interests in land, of which leaseholds were the most important). Chattels personal could be further subdivided into choses in possession (interests in tangible movables, including animals, merchandise, and goods) and choses in action (interests in intangibles, including promissory notes and rights of action). The distinction between real and personal property, though still observed today, is of less significance in Anglo-American legal systems than it once was.

Law.com Dictionary

n. 1) all land, structures, firmly attached and integrated equipment (such as light fixtures or a well pump), anything growing on the land, and all "interests" in the property, which may include the right to future ownership (remainder), right to occupy for a period of time (tenancy or life estate), the right to drill for oil, the right to get the property back (a reversion) if it is no longer used for its current purpose (such as use for a hospital, school or city hall), use of airspace (condominium) or an easement across another's property. Real property should be thought of as a group of rights like a bundle of sticks which can be divided. It is distinguished from personal property which is made up of movable items. 2) one of the principal areas of law like contracts, negligence, probate, family law and criminal law.

Lawyers.com

Property consisting of land, buildings, crops, or other resources still attached to or within the land or improvements or fixtures permanently attached to the land or a structure on it.

Lect Law Library

REAL PROPERTY - Land and all the things that are attached to it. Anything that is not real property is personal property and personal property is anything that isn't nailed down, dug into or built onto the land. A house is real property, but a dining room set is not.

That which consists of land, and of all rights and profits arising from and annexed to land, of a permanent, immovable nature. In order to make one's interest in land, real estate, it must be an interest not less than for the party's life, because a term of years, even for a thousand years, perpetually renewable, is a mere personal estate. It is usually comprised under the words lands, tenements, and hereditaments. Real property is corporeal, or incorporeal.

Corporeal consists wholly of substantial, permanent objects, which may all be comprehended under the general denomination of land. There are some chattels which are so annexed to the inheritance, that they are deemed a part of it, and are called heir looms. Money agreed or directed to be laid out in land is considered as real estate.

Incorporeal property, consists of certain inheritable rights, which are not, strictly speaking, of a corporeal nature, or land, although they are by their own nature or by use, annexed to corporeal inheritances, and are rights issuing out of them, or which concern them. These distinctions agree with the civil law. Just. Inst. The incorporeal hereditaments which subsist by the laws of the several states are fewer than those recognized by the English law. In the United States, there are fortunately no advowsons, tithes, nor dignities, as inheritances.

Wikipedia

Real property and personal property are the main classifications of property in the common law. Real property refers to land and the improvements made by human efforts—buildings, machinery, the acquisition of various property rights, and the like. Real property is also termed realty, real estate, and immovable property.